Natural whites at 30% off!

Big savings on truly unique wines! Taste all five this Friday at Vino

Edi Kante captured by Treviso-based German photographer Wolfgang Wesener.

Friulan winemaker Edi Kante captured by Treviso-based German photographer Wolfgang Wesener.

While some Italian wine lovers claim white wine is intrinsically inferior to red, at Vino we strongly subscribe to the notion that our many great whites are no less significant than the often more celebrated reds with which they share a shelf. The winemakers we feature today all have a commitment to proving the finest white wines can compete with Italy’s noble reds. It’s a philosophy reflected in their techniques: these producers have often gone to extreme lengths to get the most from their grape.

Stanislao "Stanko" Radikon took over his father's winery, located in Oslavia, in 1980.

Stanislao "Stanko" Radikon took over his father's winery, located in Oslavia, in 1980. His first initiative was to begin bottling the estate's wines, which up until then had been sold as "vino sfuso".

In the north-eastern region of Friuli, home to Italy’s most avant-garde white winemakers, eccentric methods abound. A true individual in the wine world, Edi Kante carved spectacular state-of-the-art cellars out of the mountainside of Friuli’s Carso zone twenty years ago; in the mid-1990s Stanislao Radikon reintroduced out-of-favor conical vats with which to macerate his grapes; and in the case of Josko Gravner, this one-man movement ages his wine in subterranean ceramic amphorae shipped from Georgia.

Josko Gravner poses with his giant amphorae ("anfora" in Italian) which he has imported by truck from the former Soviet state of Georgia.

Josko Gravner poses with his giant amphorae ("anfora" in Italian) which he has imported by truck from the former Soviet state of Georgia.

But Italy’s top white wine producers are not only found in Friuli. Both Tuscany’s Guido Gualandi and Elena Pantaleoni of Emilia-Romagna offer whites which are as unique as the producers who made them. Gualandi’s Vinum (the latin word for wine) follows a recipe dating back to Ancient Rome which blends Malvasia del Chianti and a clone of Trebbiano known as Coda di Cavallo (literally “horse’s tail”). Named after one of Pantaleoni’s ancestors, La Stoppa’s distinctly orange-hued Ageno is also a Malvasia-Trebbiano blend, and recently received this glowing review by Alder Yarrow on Vinography.

Take home these remarkable wines at an incredible 30% off!

5-natural-whites-blogVinum 2007 Guido Gualandi
was $40, now $28

Sauvignon 2006 Edi Kante
was $44, now $30.80

Ageno 2004 La Stoppa
was $40, now $28

Ribolla Gialla Anfora 2001 Gravner
was $89, now $62.30

Oslavje 1999 Radikon
was $46, now $32.20

All five of these wines will be available to try at our FREE tasting this Friday, January 30th, from 5:30-7:30pm For more information please call 212-725-6516 or email contact@vinosite.com.

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