Amarone Tasting

Taste of Puglia Dinner April 18

I Trulli and Tour de Forks present:

Taste of Puglia Dinner
with Charles and Michele Scicolone
Wednesday, April 18, 7:30 p.m.
Ristorante I Trulli
122 East 27th St.
five wines, five courses
$125.00 (inclusive)
Limited seating
To reserve, please send an email
to events@vinosite.com.

Or call events coordinator Jeremy Parzen at 212-679-0822.

In recent years, Puglia (the region that forms the heel of the Italian boot) has become of one Italy’s top travel destinations and the inspiration for some of the best Italian regional cuisine found today in North America.

When the Marzovilla family opened I Trulli in 1994, no one could imagine the Southern Italian craze that was about to explode. In 1998, Amanda Hesser wrote in the New York Times (“A Southern Italian Renaissance; After red sauce, America is discovering the real thing.”):

“It is no secret that Italian cuisine has experienced a renaissance in American kitchens over the last decade. But it is just recently that chefs have turned their attention to the far regions of the south — like Puglia, Calabria, Campania, Sicily and Sardinia — where the foods are earthy, the flavors are lusty and the fresh, candid style is a world apart from the heavy monotonous red sauces familiar in the United States.

Americans, raised on the idea that Southern Italian food is all about dishes like eggplant Parmesan and spaghetti with meatballs, are about to be enlightened: genuine Southern Italian food has finally arrived.

Dora Marzovilla at I Trulli on East 27th Street has been making traditional Pugliese pasta shapes like ear-shaped orecchiette and shell-shaped cavatelli by hand for years — at first at home, and now at the restaurant…

Nicola Marzovilla, Mrs. Marzovilla’s son and the owner of I Trulli, said, ‘The cooking in Southern Italy, if there’s one simple way to describe it — the ingredients are the focal point of everything.'”

I Trulli would receive two stars in a New York Times review by then food editor Ruth Reichl in 1999.

Join Vino’s Wine Director Charles Scicolone and renowned cookbook author and Italian food expert Michele Scicolone at I Trulli for a taste of some of Puglia’s best-known dishes, including Dora’s handmade cavatelli with broccoli rabe and orecchiette. The dinner will also feature native Pugliese grape varieties like Primitivo, Negro Amaro, and Uva di Troia.

Seats are filling up fast, so make sure you reserve your place now by writing to events@vinosite.com.

The dinner is co-presented by Tour de Forks, who will be leading a tour to Puglia this fall together with Charles and Michele. Please visit their website for more details.

Amarone Tasting and Class (March 14)

This Friday (5:30-7:30) and Saturday (4:30-6:30) the Vino staff will be pouring 5 wines from Verona, including the Amarone Marano 1990 Boscaini.

Friday and Saturday tastings at Vino are FREE.
To register for the free tastings, please send an email to events@vinosite.com.

If you want to read more about Amarone, take a look at Eric Asimov’s recent column in the New York Times on the wines (among the top-rated selections was Le Ragose 2001 Sant’Eugenio).

There are still a few places left in the March 14 “Amarone and the Wines of the Veneto” class. For registration info, see below:

Amarone and the Wines of the Veneto
Wednesday, March 14, 6:30pm, $95.00

To register, please send an email to register@vinosite.com.

Verona and Valpolicella, the Colli Euganei, Lago di Garda (Lake Garda), Valpolicella and Conegliano, Breganze… Even though they are counted among Italy’s most collectible appellations, the wines of the Veneto are perhaps the least well known in the United States. From Amarone della Valpolicella, Recioto della Valpolicella, and the many wines of Lago di Garda in the province of Verona, to Conegliano and Valdobbiadene where Prosecco grapes have been grown since ancient times, from the Colli Euganei outside Padova where medieval poet Petrarch spent his last years and where rich Cabernet and Merlot are grown, to Breganze where some of Italy’s most famous dessert wines and grappas are produced, the Veneto is one of the last “undiscovered countries” of Italian wine. Wine Director Charles Scicolone leads participants through a guided tasting of wines that range from bubbly Prosecco to vintage Amarone and Recioto.

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