New Chef at I Trulli

When Florence Fabricant writes it in the Times, you know it’s news: today’s Dining In section reports that Florentine-born Patrick Nuti has officially taken over the kitchen at Ristorante I Trulli as the restaurant’s new Executive Chef. Patrick (pictured right carving a whole stuffed goat that he prepared for the Tenuta del Portale dinner) has worked at a number of New York’s top Italian eateries but he made his name as the chef of the legendary Florentine trattoria Cibreo. Although I Trulli will continue to feature Pugliese cuisine and Dora Marzovilla’s handmade pasta, Chef Nuti will be unveiling his new menu at the end of this month.

Weekly Wine Tasting
Thursday and Friday
October 5-6
5:30-7:30
FREE!!!

Sample the new flight list at Enoteca I Trulli… for free!!!

For more information see below.

Vertical Dinner featuring
Produttori del Barbaresco

moderated by Charles Scicolone
Wine Director, I Trulli and Vino
Tuesday, October 24, 8:00 p.m.
Ristorante I Trulli
Limited seating
to reserve, please send an email
to events@vinosite.com

Like the appellation itself, the Produttori del Barbaresco winery is one of the world’s greatest, yet also one of the most misunderstood. When vinified in the traditional manner (long maceration followed by aging in large, old oak barrels), Barbaresco can take 20 and even 30 years (for exceptional vintages) to reach its peak potential. While many Barbaresco producers have turned to new oak and concentration to create wines drinkable at an earlier age, Produttori has refused to change its approach to and philosophy of winemaking.

Thanks to our relationship with the winery and its importer, we have obtained a lot of old Produttori del Barbaresco going back to 1978. The wines are coming directly from the winery to us. Highlights will include:

1978 Pora (cru)
1979 Asili (cru)
1996 Barbaresco
and
1997 Ovello (cru)

For more information and to reserve, click here.

* * *

Featured Tasting: New Flights at Enoteca I Trulli

This week’s tastings feature new Fall flights at Enoteca I Trulli (flights consist of three tasting pours, organized by region, wine type, and/or theme).

This Thursday and Friday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
121 East 27th St.
between Park and Lex.
FREE
800-965-VINO
contact@vinosite.com

Flight #1 Women Producers
In recent years, Italy has seen the emergence of women winemakers who are changing the face of Italian wine.

Barbera d’Asti 2004 Cascina Castle’t
(click here to order)

The vines that Mariuccia Borio uses for the production of this wine are 40-50 years old. Because of their age, the roots have to strain to reach the water in the clay and limestone subsoil. As a result, the fruit becomes richer and the wine more intensely flavored. With its bright acidity, this Barbera is an ideal food wine that will pair well with spicy pasta sauces but also grilled white meats.

Aglianico del Vulture Vigne a Capanno 2001 Tenuta del Portale
(click here to order)

“My wines are intended to convey a message from the past to the future,” says winemaker Filena Ruppi. Her Vigne a Capanno is named after a now obsolete vine-training method whereby the indigenous reeds of Basilicata were used as stakes for the vines (the reeds were used to build a “capanno,” i.e., a pergola or “hut”). Filena is one of a new generation of emerging women vintners in Italy.

Macchiona 2001 La Stoppa
(click here to order)

Macchiona is a blend of Barbera (50%) and Bonarda (50%) sourced from forty-year-old vines that the Pantaleone family has tended since they were planted. First made in 1973, this wine is aged in medium-sized Slavonian oak barrels that gently toast the wine. “The wine is drinking very well already,” says winemaker Elena Pantaleone, “but this is a label that is really intended for extended aging.” We recently tasted some older vintages from her cellar and indeed this wine will only get better with time.

Flight #5 Sangiovese
For those of you who read the weekly wine new from Vino, you know that Sangiovese is one of Charles Scicolone’s favorite grapes and that he is particularly fond of Chianti. This flight features three different expressions of Sangiovese from Umbria, Montlacino (Brunello), and Chianti (in this case, Chianti Rufina).

Chianti Rufina 2001 Travignoli
(click here to order)

The Chianti produced in Rufina (pronounced ROO-fee-nah) has remarkable aging potential thanks to the elevation in this northern area of the Chianti appellation. Travignoli’s Chianti Riserva is made in traditional large oak barrels that allow naturally occurring yeasts to bring out the classic flavors and aromas of this subzone. Also available in large format.

Poggio alle Querce 2001 Castello delle Regine
(click here to order)

The aptly named Castello delle Regine is thus called because it is a “Castle for Queens.” Tucked into the picturesque Umbrian countryside, it is one of the region’s most prestigious vacation desination: the property includes a hotel, restaurant, olive groves and mill, and, of course, vineyards and winery. Since the Middle Ages, this estate has passed from one family of nobles to another.

While the Castello delle Regine 100% Merlot (Poggio alle Ghiande) is widely considered one of the best to come out of Umbria, its Poggio alle Querce is perhaps one of the most “true” expressions of Umbrian Sangiovese. From the elegant label to its gentle balance of acidity and tanin, this wine is as noble as the place whence it comes: a Sangiovese fit for a queen.

Martinozzi 1999 Brunello di Montalcino
(click here to order)

The Castelli Martinozzi estate is located in Santa Restituta at some of the highest altitudes in the appellation. The elevation allows the grapes to ripen slowly as they are cooled during the evening even as temperatures rise in summer. Proximity to the seaside creates ventilation and thus reduces the risk of mildew.

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