Barolo Week at Vino

October 25, 2006

There are 6 Barolos on sale (20% off) this week (Weds.-Weds.) at www.VinoSiteShop.com. Although the wines are available at a discount all week long online, you can also come into the store and taste them for FREE on Thursday and Friday.The WINES WILL BE DISCOUNTED IN-STORE THURSDAY AND FRIDAY ONLY.

Winemaker Mario Andrion of Castello di Verduno will be on hand Friday to pour his 1998 Barolo Massara.

See the Tasting Notes below for more information on the sale.

Vertical Il Poggione Dinner, Nov. 7

Space at the Nov. 7 Vertical Il Poggione Brunello di Montalcino dinner (with winemaker Alessandro Bindocci) is filling up fast: there are a few seats left. To reserve, please call or email events coordinator Jeremy Parzen at 212-679-0822 or events@vinosite.com. Many of the older vintages (going back to 1978) are also available exclusively to Vino customers and are sourced directly from Il Poggione’s cellar in Sant’Angelo in Colle. If you’d like to receive a list of available wines and prices, please contact Jeremy. Sales are subject to availability.

For more information, click here.

CARMIGNANO 1996 IS HERE!

See Charles’ Wine Opinion below or click here to purchase.

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This Week’s Tasting: Barolo

This week’s tastings feature 6 Barolos: receive 20% off all of these wines all week at www.VinoSiteShop.com or come in to the store on Thurs. and/or Friday to taste them.

THE WINES WILL BE DISCOUNTED THURS. AND FRI. ONLY IN-STORE.

On Friday, winemaker Mario Andrion of Castello di Verduno will join us to pour is 1998 Barolo Massara.

Barolo Week at Vino

This Thursday and Friday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
and all week online
121 East 27th St.
between Park and Lex.
FREE
800-965-VINO
contact@vinosite.com

Barolo Bussia 1999 Aldo Conterno

REGULARLY $76
$60.80 this week only online

Aldo Conterno has long been considered one of Barolo’s grand masters. His exquisitely elegant wines are often compared to the Grand Crus of Burgundy in terms of their terroir expression and finesse. Indeed, Aldo himself points to Burgundy as the inspiration for his style of winemaking. Bussia is one of Barolo’s greatest vineyards and Aldo Conterno has produced some of the site’s greatest vintages. This 1999 will only get better (and increase with value) as it ages. A must-have for collectors of Barolo.

Barolo Cannubi 2000 Fenocchio

REGULARLY $43
$34.40 this week only online

This single-vineyard Barolo is made by one of the appellation’s most respected producers, Giacomo Fenocchio, and is released under the De Rham label by Florentine wine impresario Barbara De Rham. Cannubi is arguably Barolo’s most famous vineyard and expression and many consider it to be the most definitive. The 2000 vintage was perhaps the warmest of the 1996-2000 string of superior harvests and thanks to the ripeness of the fruit, it is already beginning to show very well.

Barolo Massara 1998 Castello di Verduno

REGULARLY $66
$52.80 this week only online

Castello di Verduno’s Barolo Massara is sourced from one of the great “crus” or vineyards of Barolo, Massara. Locals call the site a sorì d’la matin, meaning an ideal site that benefits from sunlight in the morning. As a result of the eastern exposure, the grapes sourced from this historic vineyard cool off during the afternoon and can ripen properly even in overly hot summers. 1998 was one of a historic string of excellent vintages (1996-2001) vintages in the Langhe.

Barolo Merlotti 2000 Cavagnero

REGULARLY $49
$39.20 this week only online

Carlo Cavagnero is one of Barolo’s youngest and brightest rising stars. He makes his Barolo in the traditional style: his Merlotti (named after his estate, the Tre Merlotti or Three Blackbirds) is blended from estate-owned vineyards in La Morra, one of the appellation’s five top townships. While single-vineyard “crus” Barolos have become increasingly popular in recent years, Carlo has chosen to stick with tradition and make blended Barolo, using the best fruit from his best growing sites (the remaining fruit goes into his Nebbiolo d’Alba, which is intended for drinking young).

Barolo Pressenda 2000 Abbona

REGULARLY $47
$37.60 this week only online

A top “cru” (vineyard) of Piedmont, the Pressenda vineyard lies in the township of Monforte d’Alba where the Helvetian subsoil produces some of the most structured and long-lived wines in the world. Abbona’s bottling is made from vines planted in 1965: the older the vine, the farther the roots dig down into the soil. As a result, the soil imparts its minerality to the fruit, which in turn, gives the wine its characteristic earthy, tar flavor. Abbona made only 9,800 bottles of this hand-crafted Barolo.

Barolo Sorì Gepin 1998 Spinona

REGULARLY $40
$32.00 this week only online

La Spinona is a traditional-style producer who makes long-lived, terroir-driven Barolo. For this wine, the fruit was sourced exclusively from the Sorì Gepin, a site that enjoys perfect exposure (denoted by the dialectal term sorì) in the township of Novello (between Barolo and Monforte).

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Wine Opinion: Who Says Sangiovese Can’t Age?

In 1985, I had the privilege of having Count Ugo Bonacossi and his wife at my home for dinner. This was an extraordinary event: not only because the Count and his wife were there, but also because my wife Michele was on a business trip, and I had to prepare the meal with a little help from my friends. Count Ugo is the owner of the Capezzano winery in Toscana, which, in my opinion, makes the best wine from the Carmignano appellation. For those of you who don’t know Carmignano, it is a blend of Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon grown in the province of Prato, just northwest of Firenze (Cabernet Franc is also permitted).

That night we drank a number of wines from his estate. The last wine, however, was a wine that, at the time it was produced, was not called Carmignano but rather it was called Chianti (editor’s note: the Carmignano appellation lies within the Chianti Montalbano appellation and although it has been recognized unofficially for centuries, it was not until 1975 that it acquired DOC status, DOCG in 1991). The Count poured this wine himself and then proudly announced that this was the first wine that he remembered his father making.

The year was 1925 (the wine, not the dinner!). That meant that the wine was 60 years old. As we all tasted it, we looked at each other in amazement: the wine seemed as if it were only 10 or 15 years old. Who says that Sangiovese can’t age? (There was very little Cabernet in the wine, certainly less than the winemaker uses today.) I have been drinking the Carmignano from Bonacossi since the early 1980s and it has always been one of my favorite wines because it never seems to disappoint. A few years ago, after one of our trips to Vinitaly, we stopped at the winery and they opened some vintages for us from the 1930s. In all truthfulness, some of them were showing their age and some of them were not. In 1997 the estate revamped its approach to winemaking and the winemaker began adding more Cabernet Sauvignon and using new French oak (barrique). They still make a great wine, however in the modern style.

A few weeks ago, the North American representatives for Capezzano came into Vino. We tasted some of the wines and I asked them if they had any older vintages. The rep said, yes, “We have some 1996 Riserva.” This was the last wine labeled “Riserva” and the last wine made in the old style by the winery. By coincidence, the woman who helped me cook the dinner the night that Michele was away happened to be in the store with her husband and we tasted the 1996 Riserva together and we talked about that dinner long ago. The next week, I invited them over for dinner — Michele cooked, of course — and we opened up a 1985 Carmignano Riserva to commemorate the 20 years since that dinner. It was drinking perfectly.

At Vino, I was lucky enough to obtain the very last bottles of the 1996 Carmignano Riserva. They told me how many cases that they had and I said, “We’ll take it all.” We don’t have much and many bottles have been reserved already (of course, I’ve taken some home for myself). If you’d like to buy some, please send an email to my colleague William Leonard-Lee at william@vinosite.com, and he will take care of your order personally. You can also buy the wine on our site, http://www.VinoSiteShop.com. For many reasons, this is a historic vintage of a historic wine.

In unrelated news, you will not be surprised to find out that I appear in the current issue of Men’s Vogue. They wanted me to pose for the cover, but unfortunately Hugh Jackman (otherwise known as the “Boy from Oz”) got the gig instead of me (see his picture, right). You can however look for my interview with Lawrence Osborne (author of The Accidental Connoisseur: An Irreverent Journey Through the Wine World) in the current issue. He and I tasted a number of grappas together. To read his article, please click here.
–Charles Scicolone, Wine Director, I Trulli and Vino

Charles would love to hear from you. Please email him at charles@vinosite.com.


Special Web Offers and Vertical Il Poggione Dinner

October 18, 2006

Vertical Il Poggione Dinner, Nov. 7

Space at the Nov. 7 Vertical Il Poggione Brunello di Montalcino dinner (with winemaker Alessandro Bindocci) is filling up fast: there are a few spaces left. To reserve, please call or email events coordinator Jeremy Parzen at 212-679-0822 or events@vinosite.com. Many of the older vintages (going back to 1978) are also available exclusively to Vino customers and are sourced directly from Il Poggione’s cellar in Sant’Angelo in Colle. If you’d like to receive a list of available wines and prices, please contact Jeremy. Sales are subject to availability.

Vertical Dinner featuring
Il Poggione Brunello di Montalcino

with winemaker Alessandro Bindocci
Tuesday, November 7, 8:00 p.m.
Ristorante I Trulli

For more information, click here.

In other news…

Many of your favorite wines are now available at a 20% discount online at www.VinoSiteShop.com.

Subject to availability.

As advertised in the New York Times Dining In section, each week we will be featuring some of our most popular and collectible wines at a 20% discount exclusively on the web. This week’s sale wines include Naima 2003 from De Conciliis, a modern-style Aglianico inspired by the John Coltrane composition, and Monchiero Barolo Rocche 2000, a top-rated vintage and a single-vineyard Barolo from a one of our favorite “traditionalist” producers in the Langhe. To read more about these and other sale wines, click here.

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This Week’s Tasting: Current Wines from Tre Bicchieri Winner (Piemonte)

This Thursday and Friday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
121 East 27th St.
between Park and Lex.
FREE
800-965-VINO
contact@vinosite.com

Vareij 2004 Hilberg
(click here to order)

Hilberg’s Vareij is a highly unusual wine made from a blend of Barbera and Brachetto (the latter is almost exclusively vinified as a sparkling, sweet dessert wine). The name Vareij literally means “varied” in Piedmontese dialect and is inspired by the fact that no one on record has blended these two grapes together. The wine has a wonderful lightness (from the Brachetto) but good acid and mouthfeel from the Barbera. Hilberg has won the Tre Bicchieri award repeatedly for its Nebbiolo d’Alba, available by special order only.

Dolcetto di Dogliani Papa Celso 2003 Abbona
(click here to order)

Marziano Abbona’s Dolcetto di Dogliani is named Papa Celso after his father who planted their Dolcetto vines between the two world wars when Marziano was just a child. This Dolcetto is still made from grapes grown on these 60-year-old vines. Marziano often reminds us that while in Asti and Alba, the best growing sites are reserved for Nebbiolo and Barbera, in Dogliani (where this wine is made) the best sites are used exclusively for Dolcetto. Abbona won the Tre Bicchieri award for its Dolcetto di Dogliani Superiore Papa Celso 2005.

Barbaresco 2002 Produttori del Barbaresco
(click here to order)

In 2002, legendary winemaker Aldo Vacca of the Produttori del Barbaresco cooperative decided not to make his cru wines. Instead, he used his very best fruit to make his traditionally blended Barbaresco. This wine represents one of those rare occasions when the winemaker opts to use his top grapes for his blended Barbaresco. This is drinking beautifully and will only get better with age. A great way to approach Barbaresco for the newcomer. Produttori del Barbaresco won the Tre Bicchieri for its Barbaresco Riserva Paje 2001 and its Barbaresco Riserva Rio Sordo 2001.

Barolo Massara 1998 Castello di Verduno
(click here to order)

Castello di Verduno’s Barolo Massara is sourced from one of the great “crus” or vineyards of Barolo, Massara. Locals call the site a sori d’la matin, meaning an ideal site that benefits from sunlight in the morning. As a result of the eastern exposure, the grapes sourced from this historic vineyard cool off during the afternoon and can ripen properly even in overly hot summers. 1998 was one of a historic string of excellent vintages (1996-2001) vintages in the Langhe. Castello di Verduno won the Tre Bicchieri for the 2001 Barolo Massara.

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Wine Opinion: What Makes a Tre Bicchieri Wine

For those of you who have followed Vino and my wine opinions closely, you know that I — and we — are not particularly fond of wine ratings and scores. I’ll leave to the imagination the publications and persons to whom I am referring when I write this.

However, for many years now, one of the leading, if not the top, wine publications in Italy has been the Gambero Rosso Guida ai Vini d’Italia or “Guide to Italian Wines.” The guide is released every year in Italy around this time. The English edition isn’t published until March-April of the following year. But, because here at Vino, we not only drink Italian, we also speak and read Italian, we rush out to read the evaluations and to see the ratings.

For those of you who know the guide, you know that they do not “score” the wines as many of our illustrious colleagues do. Instead, they have devised a highly poetic rating system that we at Vino — myself and staff included — find to be of great interest and appropriate to the nature of tasting and sharing wine.

Last year, at the presentation of the guide in New York, when our friend Enrico Coser received the award for Best White of the Year (for his Collio Fosarin), the guide’s editor-in-chief Daniele Cernili explained his now famous “Three Glass” system as follows.

He explained that a bottle of wine contains six glasses. Since you should never drink a bottle of wine alone, this means that you and your companion can each have 3 glasses. According to his theory, if you and your friend kind of like the wine, you’ll have one glass each. If you like it, you might have two glasses. But if you really like it, you’ll finish the whole bottle and thus you’ll each drink three glasses of wine. These wines, he says, are “Tre Bicchieri” wines or “Three Glass” wines, the highest ranking that the guide bestows each year.

Every year, only a handful of wines from each region of Italy receive this prestigious honor. For the next few weeks, we will be featuring labels from some of our favorite wineries that have again received the award (although we won’t be receiving the wines themselves until the spring because they have been released in Italy only recently).

At this week’s tasting, I will be pouring wines from Piedmontese producers who have once again received the Tre Bicchieri award.
–Charles Scicolone, Wine Director, I Trulli and Vino

Charles would love to hear from you. Please email him at charles@vinosite.com.


Vertical Barbaresco Dinner

October 11, 2006

Space at the October 24 Vertical Produttori del Barbaresco dinner with Charles Scicolone is filling up fast: there are a few spaces left. Please email events@vinosite.com to reserve.

Vertical Dinner featuring
Produttori del Barbaresco

moderated by Charles Scicolone
Wine Director, I Trulli and Vino
Tuesday, October 24, 8:00 p.m.
Ristorante I Trulli

In other news…

We recently spoke with Alessandro Bindocci, winemaker at Il Poggione, and he has informed us that he will be pouring the following wines at his Meet Your Winemaker Dinner on Tuesday, November 7:

1999 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva
1997 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva
1988 Brunello di Montalcino
1985 Brunello di Montalcino

Space is extremely limited for this event and is beginning to fill up. For information and/or to reserve, please send an email to events@vinosite.com

As one of the three original producers of the appellation, Il Poggione has been making Brunello di Montalcino since the late nineteenth-century. It was also one of the founding members of the Brunello di Montalcino Consortium in the late 1960s. While literally hundreds of Brunello producers have appeared since the appellation began garnering international fame in the 70s and 80s, Il Poggione has continued to make traditional-style, long-lived Brunello without bowing to the pressures of the “New World” marketplace. The winemaker still employs “promiscuous” farming in its vineyards (where olive groves stand side-by-side with Sangiovese vines as they have for hundreds of years) and the estate’s Brunello – made using estate-grown fruit exclusively – is never aged in barrique (new oak). As a result of their steadfast commitment to the historic tradition of Brunello, they have consistently produced wines that can age for 20, 30, and even 40 years. During a recent visit to the winery, we tasted a 1978 Rosso di Montalcino over a Bistecca fiorentina at the Trattoria Il Pozzo in Sant’Angelo in Colle (Montalcino). The wine was drinking great: testament to a truly natural and organic approach to winemaking.

The wines listed above, as well as many other old vintages, will be made available exclusively to Vino customers on a pre-buy basis during the week of the tasting. More details to follow in the weeks leading up to the event.

All the wines will be coming directly from Il Poggione’s cellar.

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New Flights at Enoteca I Trulli

This week’s tastings feature new Fall flights at Enoteca I Trulli (flights consist of three tasting pours, organized by region, wine type, and/or theme).

This Thursday and Friday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
121 East 27th St.
between Park and Lex.
FREE
800-965-VINO
contact@vinosite.com

Flight #2 Aromatic Whites
Italy is perhaps most famous for the bone-dry white wines that come from the North. Less known but just as intriguing are the aromatic whites that hail from central and northern Italy, like the highly unusual La Gazzella from Ezio Voyat.

Traluce 2004 Le Velette

The word traluce means literally “it shines through” in Italian: the name of this wine refers to its beautiful yellow-golden color. Recently, the Sauvignon Blanc grown in Friuli has enjoyed a lot of notoriety in the wine press: few are aware that the grape has been cultivated with great success in Umbria for centuries. Le Velette is one of the region’s oldest producers and its underground cellars date to the Roman era.

La Gazzella 2003 Ezio Voyat

The late Ezio Voyat named this wine after his daughter Marilena Voyat, an educator and track star whom he liked to compare to a gazzella or gazelle. In the 1980s she was a sprinter for the Italian national team.

Made from 100% Moscato, this is a crisp white wine with great depth and structure. Shortly before the great winemaker’s passing, this wine was named “one of the top 100 white wines of Italy” at the prestigious Salone del Sapore (literally the Flavor Convention), one of Italy’s leading food and wine fairs.

Cinerino 2004 Abbona

Although the Viognier grape is cultivated traditionally in the Rhône valley of France where small amounts are blended with Syrah in the Côte Rôtie appellation, recent DNA analysis of the grape has shown that it is a “white” cousin of Nebbiolo, the varietal used to make Barolo and Barbaresco. Ever since, the experimenter Marziano Abbona has produced this Viognier from grapes grown in Dogliani (since no appellation exists for Viognier there, it simply called a Vino da Tavola or “table wine”). He named it after the elegant gray heron of Northern Italy, the Airone Cinerino meaning the “ashen heron” (from the Italian cenere or “ash”).

Flight #3 Malvasia
Malvasia has been cultivated in Italy since antiquity and today is grown across Europe where it used to make a wide variety of wines. The Malvasia flight at Enoteca I Trulli features three entirely different expressions of this versatile grape variety.

Malvasia Bianca 2005 Conti Zecca

The Malvasia grape variety is one of the Mediterranean’s most ancient and has been cultivated throughout the region for millennia. Conti Zecca’s Donna Marzia Malvasia Bianca (White Malvasia) is crisp and dry, a perfect summer white.

Malvasia 2004 Ronco dei Tassi

Famed Friulian winemaker Fabio Coser was so pleased with the 2004 vintage that he decided to make a 100% Malvasia for the first time in the history of his illustrious winery. A traditional approach to winemaking and careful selection of fruit result in a superior expression of Malvasia, which is traditionally vinified as a dry wine in Friuli.

Ageno 2004 La Stoppa

Ageno is a 100% Malvasia named after one of winemaker Elena Pantaleone’s ancestors. She lets the juice macerate with the grape skins for an extended period (a very unusual approach to vinification of white wine). The resulting wine is intensely flavored and fragrant, rich in color and taste. She generally serves it as a sorbetto, a wine to drink after big reds but before dessert.
See Charles’ Wine Opinion for his notes on this wine below.

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Fall 2006 Class Schedule

All classes last approximately 2 hours.

To register, please send an email to register@vinosite.com.

Read the rest of this entry »


New Chef at I Trulli

October 4, 2006

When Florence Fabricant writes it in the Times, you know it’s news: today’s Dining In section reports that Florentine-born Patrick Nuti has officially taken over the kitchen at Ristorante I Trulli as the restaurant’s new Executive Chef. Patrick (pictured right carving a whole stuffed goat that he prepared for the Tenuta del Portale dinner) has worked at a number of New York’s top Italian eateries but he made his name as the chef of the legendary Florentine trattoria Cibreo. Although I Trulli will continue to feature Pugliese cuisine and Dora Marzovilla’s handmade pasta, Chef Nuti will be unveiling his new menu at the end of this month.

Weekly Wine Tasting
Thursday and Friday
October 5-6
5:30-7:30
FREE!!!

Sample the new flight list at Enoteca I Trulli… for free!!!

For more information see below.

Vertical Dinner featuring
Produttori del Barbaresco

moderated by Charles Scicolone
Wine Director, I Trulli and Vino
Tuesday, October 24, 8:00 p.m.
Ristorante I Trulli
Limited seating
to reserve, please send an email
to events@vinosite.com

Like the appellation itself, the Produttori del Barbaresco winery is one of the world’s greatest, yet also one of the most misunderstood. When vinified in the traditional manner (long maceration followed by aging in large, old oak barrels), Barbaresco can take 20 and even 30 years (for exceptional vintages) to reach its peak potential. While many Barbaresco producers have turned to new oak and concentration to create wines drinkable at an earlier age, Produttori has refused to change its approach to and philosophy of winemaking.

Thanks to our relationship with the winery and its importer, we have obtained a lot of old Produttori del Barbaresco going back to 1978. The wines are coming directly from the winery to us. Highlights will include:

1978 Pora (cru)
1979 Asili (cru)
1996 Barbaresco
and
1997 Ovello (cru)

For more information and to reserve, click here.

* * *

Featured Tasting: New Flights at Enoteca I Trulli

This week’s tastings feature new Fall flights at Enoteca I Trulli (flights consist of three tasting pours, organized by region, wine type, and/or theme).

This Thursday and Friday, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
121 East 27th St.
between Park and Lex.
FREE
800-965-VINO
contact@vinosite.com

Flight #1 Women Producers
In recent years, Italy has seen the emergence of women winemakers who are changing the face of Italian wine.

Barbera d’Asti 2004 Cascina Castle’t
(click here to order)

The vines that Mariuccia Borio uses for the production of this wine are 40-50 years old. Because of their age, the roots have to strain to reach the water in the clay and limestone subsoil. As a result, the fruit becomes richer and the wine more intensely flavored. With its bright acidity, this Barbera is an ideal food wine that will pair well with spicy pasta sauces but also grilled white meats.

Aglianico del Vulture Vigne a Capanno 2001 Tenuta del Portale
(click here to order)

“My wines are intended to convey a message from the past to the future,” says winemaker Filena Ruppi. Her Vigne a Capanno is named after a now obsolete vine-training method whereby the indigenous reeds of Basilicata were used as stakes for the vines (the reeds were used to build a “capanno,” i.e., a pergola or “hut”). Filena is one of a new generation of emerging women vintners in Italy.

Macchiona 2001 La Stoppa
(click here to order)

Macchiona is a blend of Barbera (50%) and Bonarda (50%) sourced from forty-year-old vines that the Pantaleone family has tended since they were planted. First made in 1973, this wine is aged in medium-sized Slavonian oak barrels that gently toast the wine. “The wine is drinking very well already,” says winemaker Elena Pantaleone, “but this is a label that is really intended for extended aging.” We recently tasted some older vintages from her cellar and indeed this wine will only get better with time.

Flight #5 Sangiovese
For those of you who read the weekly wine new from Vino, you know that Sangiovese is one of Charles Scicolone’s favorite grapes and that he is particularly fond of Chianti. This flight features three different expressions of Sangiovese from Umbria, Montlacino (Brunello), and Chianti (in this case, Chianti Rufina).

Chianti Rufina 2001 Travignoli
(click here to order)

The Chianti produced in Rufina (pronounced ROO-fee-nah) has remarkable aging potential thanks to the elevation in this northern area of the Chianti appellation. Travignoli’s Chianti Riserva is made in traditional large oak barrels that allow naturally occurring yeasts to bring out the classic flavors and aromas of this subzone. Also available in large format.

Poggio alle Querce 2001 Castello delle Regine
(click here to order)

The aptly named Castello delle Regine is thus called because it is a “Castle for Queens.” Tucked into the picturesque Umbrian countryside, it is one of the region’s most prestigious vacation desination: the property includes a hotel, restaurant, olive groves and mill, and, of course, vineyards and winery. Since the Middle Ages, this estate has passed from one family of nobles to another.

While the Castello delle Regine 100% Merlot (Poggio alle Ghiande) is widely considered one of the best to come out of Umbria, its Poggio alle Querce is perhaps one of the most “true” expressions of Umbrian Sangiovese. From the elegant label to its gentle balance of acidity and tanin, this wine is as noble as the place whence it comes: a Sangiovese fit for a queen.

Martinozzi 1999 Brunello di Montalcino
(click here to order)

The Castelli Martinozzi estate is located in Santa Restituta at some of the highest altitudes in the appellation. The elevation allows the grapes to ripen slowly as they are cooled during the evening even as temperatures rise in summer. Proximity to the seaside creates ventilation and thus reduces the risk of mildew.