Italian Wine 101, this Wednesday

November 2, 2009

italianwine101poster_blog

By far our most popular class, Italian Wine 101 is offered twice this term, giving Vino’s most curious customers an extra chance to enjoy an introduction to some of Italy’s greatest grape varieties and wines.

Vino’s own William “Lucky” Lee will review Italy’s magnificent yet sometimes intimidating mosaic of local varieties and wine appellations, the two aspects which continue more often than not to boggle the minds of Italian wine novices. William will also explain the fascinating process of wine-making from grape to bottle, give pointers on storing, serving and ordering wine, and discuss wine’s important role in Italian daily life.

Featuring a carefully compiled tasting representing the supreme quality and vast diversity of Italian wine, this lively and entertaining seminar is ideal for those new to Vino and for experience enthusiasts alike. Sign up today!Do I feel Lucky? Well, do ya, punk?

ITALIAN WINE 101
with William Lee

Wednesday, November 4
6:30-8:30pm
$45

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


Add this to your dairy — oops, diary

October 25, 2009

wine cheese blog

Much like the country’s wine, cheese is produced in every region of Italy, and for Italians invariably plays an integral part in their daily diet. While it is an essential ingredient in many regional dishes, it is also common in Italy to enjoy cheese by itself, or at the very most, paired with a glass of local wine.

Vino’s Jim Hutchinson has devoted the best part of his life to the study of Italian food and wine; join him on Wednesday for a tasting of six diverse formaggi from six of Italy’s greatest cheese-producing regions. Each cheese will be paired with a special wine selected by Jim’s expert hand.

jim_hutchinson smallWINE & CHEESE
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS

Wednesday, October 28
6:30-8:30pm
$65

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


Sangiovese class, this Wednesday

October 18, 2009

Taste Central Italy’s greatest grape with Robert Scibelli

Vino’s Italian wine classes continue this Wednesday as we honor Sangiovese. Known by the Etruscans as “sanguis Jovis” (“Blood of Jove”), literary reference to Sangiovese didn’t appear until 1722. Today Sangiovese exists as the primary grape variety in Central Italy, where for over a century it has been renowned as a staple of many of Tuscany’s most highly-regarded wines, such as Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. For a generation, Sangiovese has also been a major component in the “Super-Tuscan” phenomenon, in which producers blended the grape with international varieties in order to skirt Italian winemaking laws.

Tuscany’s hot, dry climate means Sangiovese grapes are slow to ripen, which can result in quantity at the expense of quality. It therefore takes a truly skilled winemaker to produce a fine wine from Sangiovese. Join Sangiovese supremo Robert Scibelli as he presents a world-class tasting of some of his favorite expressions of this legendary grape.

SANGIOVESE
with Robert Scibelli, DWS

Wednesday, October 21
6:30-8:30pm
$65

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


OMG! DOCG!

October 7, 2009

Vino’s Italian wine classes continue, Wednesday, October 14

DOCG_blog

DOCG wines are identifiable by the distinctive pink label wrapped around the neck of the bottle, like on this Brunello di Montalcino.

What’s the difference between DOC and DOCG? Is a DOCG wine automatically superior? Why are some of my favorite wines classified IGT? If you’ve ever drunk Italian wine (and if you’re reading this, there’s a big chance you have) you’ve probably asked yourself these questions and others like them. As is the case with most things governmental in Italy, the system for classifying its wines can be apparently simple but deceptively complex, and can oftentimes cause a headache.

piedmont docg blog

As these maps clearly suggest, navigating Italy’s DOCs and DOCGs can be tricky. And that’s only Piedmont…

The DOC label assurance was launched in Italy in 1962, and was modeled on France’s AOC system. By 1980, the DOC list had become so crowded the DOCG was introduced to give greater importance to Italy’s top-drawer wines. Or as Italian wine expert Robert Scibelli himself once put it to me, it was the government’s way of saying “this time we really mean it.” Today there is some debate as to the number of wines which currently make up the DOCG list. With wine experts, bloggers, Wikipedia and even the Italian Ministry of Agriculture seemingly unable to settle on the same figure, estimates typically fluctuate anywhere between 32 and 45 appellations. Italian wine blog VinoWire (I like to think of it as the Reuters for Italian wine) has a pretty comprehensive and up-to-date take on the matter here.

On Wednesday, October 14 let Robert do the hard work for you as he attempts to deconstruct this ever-changing legal landscape which continues to leave Italian wine fans stumped. In what is an exciting new addition to Vino’s class schedule, Mr. Scibelli will also be presenting a world-class tasting of wines from some of Italy’s most famous DOCGs.

DOCG WINES
with Robert Scibelli, DWS
Wednesday, October 14
6:30-8:30pm
$65

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


Vino’s wine classes return for Fall: Italian Wine 101, September 30

September 25, 2009

Back by popular demand, our introductory wine class returns, this Wednesday, 6:30pm

italy_wine_map emailMany Vino customers often confess confusion when attempting to fathom Italy’s vast mosaic of appellations, myriad grape varieties, and countless wine-making styles. While we admit that getting to grips with Italian wine can be a daunting task, there’s no better place to start making sense of it all than Italian Wine 101, our hugely popular tasting class. Now featured twice each term, this introductory seminar will help unravel some of the mystery surrounding Italian wine, and hopefully answer those questions that have vexed you for so long.

Participants will be treated to an exclusive tasting representing the incredible diversity of Italy’s wines, expertly selected by your esteemed host, Vino’s own William “Lucky” Lee. Whether you’re an Italian wine novice or a veteran of vino, consider this class your springboard from which to dive deeper into Italian wine’s many hidden depths, while broadening your knowledge of this richly entertaining and endlessly rewarding subject.

ITALIAN WINE 101
with William Lee
Wednesday, September 30
6:30-8:30pm
$45

For more details and reservations please call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com. Check out the classes page on our website for a complete schedule of classes coming to Vino this fall!


Italian Wine 101, Part II

June 5, 2009

William “Lucky” Lee hosts the stunning sequel to Italian wine and winemaking

italy_wine_map blog

Many Vino customers confess feeling daunted when attempting to fathom Italy’s vast mosaic of appellations, myriad grape varieties, and countless wine-making styles. While we admit it can be confusing, there’s no better place to start understanding the world of vino than Italian Wine 101, Vino’s hugely popular tasting class.

Now featured twice each term, this introductory tasting class will answer all those questions regarding Italian wine that have troubled you for so long. Participants will be treated to an exclusive tasting representing the incredible diversity of Italy’s wines, expertly selected by your esteemed host, Vino’s own William “Lucky” Lee.

Whether you’re an Italian wine novice or a veteran of vino, the class is an ideal starting point from which to delve deeper into the fascinating world of Italian wine and broaden your knowledge of this richly entertaining and endlessly rewarding subject. This special “Part II” edition promises some special surprises, proving that occasionally a sequel can actually improve on the original…

lucky with white border smallerITALIAN WINE 101
with William “Lucky” Lee
Wednesday, June 10
6:30-8:30pm
$65

For more information call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.



Vino announces Spring 2009 Class Schedule

March 27, 2009

Our legendary wine classes are back for Spring!

class-blog

Spring is here… and so are Vino’s wine classes! Back by overwhelming demand, our popular tasting classes return this spring with a brand new schedule to take us right through to summer!

Class participants are treated to a unique tasting selected by the expert hand of our esteemed instructors, in fun and informative seminars guaranteed to spark lively debate. Our themed tastings explore all aspects of winemaking in Italy, often focusing on specific wines, grape varieties and winemaking regions.

Whether you’re an Italian wine novice or wish to broaden your existing knowledge, there is no better way to discover new wines, learn more about your favorites and form a greater appreciation for the complex subtleties and entertaining history of Italian wine and winemaking.

CLASS SCHEDULE SPRING 2009

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.

ITALIAN WINE 101
with William “Lucky” Lee
Wednesday, April 15
$65

By far our most popular class, Italian Wine 101 is an introduction to some of Italy’s greatest grape varieties and wines. William “Lucky” Lee reviews the process of wine-making from grape to bottle and gives pointers on storing, serving and ordering wine. The course is great for both experienced enthusiasts and those new to Italian wine.

ON THE AI6: FROM NAPLES TO BARI
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, April 22
$65

Vino takes you on a virtual road trip through Italy’s south, from the bay of Naples to the Adriatic coast, up and over the spine of the Appenines on the A16 autostrada. This highway cuts deep through wine country, roughly following the ancient Via Traiana across highlands of limestone and volcanic ash. A traveler passes through the heart of Aglianico with stops along the way to sample Coda di Volpe, Piedirosso, Falanghina, Fiano, Greco, and Nero di Troia among others.

EMILIA-ROMAGNA: ITALY’S GASTRONOMIC HEARTLAND
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, April 29
$65

Emilia-Romagna is rightly considered a culinary stronghold in Italy: a region where the best known cities – Bologna, Modena, Parma – are synonymous around the world with products which form the basis of Italian daily eating. Equally unique to the region are its popular wines – the lively, sparkling Lambrusco is the typical accompaniment to the area’s hearty dishes and rich flavors. Sample some classic Emilian dishes and enjoy wines by our favorite Lambrusco producer, Lini.

WINE & CHEESE
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, May 6
$65

Like its wine, cheese is produced in every region in Italy, and invariably plays an integral part in Italians’ daily diet. While it is an essential ingredient in many of the country’s most popular recipes, many Italians enjoy eating cheese by itself, often paired with a suitable glass of wine. Jim will discuss Italy’s cheese production and serving methods, and offer useful tips on how best to pair a cheese with wine. Taste a varied selection of some of Italy’s finest and most popular formaggi, expertly matched with some of Vino’s favorite wines.

i-trulli-15-years-icon-2ITALIAN BREAD
with Chef Patti Jackson
Saturday, May 16
$85

Not a lot of people know that before she became a top chef, Patti Jackson spent nearly 20 years as a baker. Now witness this extensive baking prowess as she demostrates the preparation behind some of I Trulli’s favorite breads. As anyone who has traveled extensively in Italy will tell you, Italian bread is as diverse as the country’s wines. Foccaccia, schiacciata, grissini and taralli are just some of the typical Italian bread products featured in this fun new addition to Vino’s class schedule.

NOBLE NEBBIOLO
with Robert Scibelli, DWS
Wednesday, May 20
$75

Famed the world over for its use in the oft-celebrated Barolo and Barbaresco, the Nebbiolo grape variety actually goes a lot further, resulting in some of Italy’s most interesting wines. Let Robert guide you through a tasting of some excellent expressions of this legendary grape.

i-trulli-15-years-icon-21PASTA-MAKING
with Dora Marzovilla and Chef Patti Jackson
Saturday, May 30
$85

Visitors to Italy (and I Trulli!) will undoubtedly be familiar with the delight that is fresh pasta. But why are so many of us disinclined to reproduce it at home? A little flour and water never hurt anyone, and making pasta from scratch is in fact a fast and simple procedure. Dora Marzovilla has been rolling fresh pasta at I Trulli since its doors first opened in 1994. As mother of restaurant owner Nicola Marzovilla, who better to teach the uninitiated? Dora will demonstrate preparation techniques for what is a cornerstone of Italian cooking.

THE KILLER B’s: BAROLO, BARBARESCO & BRUNELLO
with Robert Scibelli, DWS
Wednesday, June 3
$95

Hailed by wine lovers around the world, Piedmont’s Barolo and Barbaresco and Tuscan giant Brunello di Montalcino are undoubtedly three of Italy’s greatest wines. Their modern elevated status lends these wines a certain mystique, which Robert Scibelli will help you understand in this world-class tasting. Learn the epic history, assess the varied production techniques and discover the hidden truths behind the legends of these fantastic wines.

ITALIAN WINE 101
with William “Lucky” Lee
Wednesday, June 10
$65

Vino offers Italian Wine 101 twice this term! William “Lucky” Lee reviews the process of wine-making from grape to bottle and answers questions on storing, serving and ordering wine. The course is great for both experienced enthusiasts and those new to Italian wine.

ITALIAN EFFERVESCENCE
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, June 17
$65

Though often enjoyed as a before-dinner aperitivo or as a less-expensive alternative to Champagne, Italian sparkling wines are in fact as varied in style, taste and production as their still counterparts. No surprise then, that Italians are just as likely to drink such wines before, during or after a meal. Prosecco, Franciacorta and Lambrusco are just the most recognized varieties within Italy’s lengthy list of delightful bubblies. Taste diverse sparkling wines from various Italian regions in what is an ideal introduction to a slightly misunderstood class of wines.

For further details please visit our website, vinosite.com.


Mountain Wine, Mountain Cheese

March 17, 2009

Jim Hutchinson comes down from the mountain for a brand new tasting class this Wednesday

The Dolomites in northern Trentino create one of Italy's most dramatic mountain landscapes.

The Dolomites in northern Trentino create one of Italy's most dramatic mountain landscapes.

From the northern Alpine ranges, down along the spine of the Apennines and onto the islands, Italy is a country of mountains. Virtually every region has a significant peak or range and much of that topography has, for millenia, been cradle and crucible to unique cultures whose dialects, traditions and foodways can vary dramatically from valley to valley.

The view from Turin's Via Cernaia looking towards Stazione Porta Susa and the Alps beyond. The constant, imposing presence of mountains on many Italian towns cannot be underestimated.

The view from Turin's Via Cernaia looking towards Stazione Porta Susa and the Alps beyond. The constant, imposing presence of mountains on many Italian towns cannot be underestimated.

This Wednesday, March 18, join us at Vino for Mountain Cheese, Mountain Wine, a brand new addition to our class schedule. Participants will sample six of Italy’s finest mountain cheeses, including Fontina, Talleggio and Robiola, each paired with a carefully selected wine from the same region. Jim Hutchinson, DWS (a man for whom there ain’t no mountain high enough) will be your guide in this tasting expedition, in which you’ll discover just some of the extraordinary products that have emerged over time from the Italian highlands.

Mountain Cheese, Mountain Wine
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, March 18, 6:30-8:30pm
$65

For more information and reservations call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


Amarone and the wines of Verona

March 9, 2009

Discover the wine behind the legend at Vino this Wednesday

passito!

Rolled-up passito mats, upon which grapes are dried to make Amarone and Ripasso.

Amarone is perhaps Italian wine’s greatest mistake. According to popular legend, the wine was created by accident in the 1930s when a producer of the Veronese passito Recioto forgot to stop fermentation, thus inadvertently allowing all of the wine’s sugar to be transformed into alcohol. The result was “Amarone” (literally “big bitter”). An instant local hit in Verona, only following the appellation’s award of DOC status in 1990 has Amarone seen a large surge in demand, and today it is one of Italy’s most famous and collectable wines.

Amarone is produced by drying Corvina, Molinara and Rondinella grapes on straw mats, after which the raisinated fruit is vinified. This unique wine breaks many traditional conventions of Italian winemaking: while it is a dried-grape wine it is also dry, not sweet, notably high in alcohol, and notoriously challenging to pair properly.

On Wednesday, March 11, join Amarone authority Robert Scibelli, DWS, for a revealing tasting seminar designed to uncover some of the mystery surrounding this rare wine. The class will also examine some of the other significant wines from the Verona area, including Valpolicella, Ripasso, Bardolino and Soave.

Amarone and the Wines of Verona
with Robert Scibelli, DWS
Wednesday, March 11, 6:30-8:30pm
$95

March on: more wine and food classes coming up…

Mountain Cheese, Mountain Wine
with Jim Hutchinson, DWS
Wednesday, March 18, 6:30-8:30pm
$65

Cooking an Italian Easter
with Chef Patti Jackson
Saturday, March 28, 1:30-3:30pm
$105

Click here for Vino’s full Winter 2009 Schedule!

For more information call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.


In fair Verona…

November 14, 2008

Discover the legend of Amarone and the unique wines of Verona in our final class of the fall season

verona

Verona's Piazza delle Erbe is a great place to watch the world go by, preferably while enjoying a glass of the local vino.

Despite its relatively modest production, Amarone enjoys its current standing as one of Italy’s most fascinating and collectable wines, though it could have just as easily never existed. According to popular legend, the wine was created by accident in the 1930s when a producer of the veronese passito Recioto forgot to stop fermentation. This inadvertently allowed all of the wine’s sugar to be transformed into alcohol, resulting in the name “Amarone” (literally “big bitter”).

produced by drying Corvina, Molinara, and Rondinella grapes on straw mats and reintroducing the raisinated fruit to a base wine in a process known as the ripasso method.

Amarone is produced by drying Corvina, Molinara, and Rondinella grapes on straw mats and reintroducing the raisinated fruit to a base wine in a process known as the ripasso method.

Wine producers began officially trading Amarone in the 1950s and it proved an instant success with locals in Verona. Only following the appellation’s award of DOC status in 1990 has Amarone seen a large surge in demand. It remains unique within Italy’s vast viticultural panorama, a wine which breaks many traditional Italian winemaking conventions: while it is a dried-grape wine it is also dry, not sweet, notably high in alcohol, and notoriously challenging to pair properly.

Some of Verona's best wines can be sampled at wine shops like this one.

Some of Verona's best wines can be sampled in shops like this one, in the heart of the city's centro storico.

On Wednesday, November 19 join Amarone authority Robert Scibelli, DWS, for our final class of the fall season, Amarone and the Wines of Verona. This revealing tasting seminar will uncover some of the mystery surrounding this rare wine, while also examining some of the other significant wines from the Verona area, including Valpolicella, Bardolino, and Soave.

Amarone and the Wines of Verona
with Robert Scibelli, DWS
Wednesday, November 19
6:30-8:30pm
$95

Vino
121 East 27th Street
New York, NY 10016

For further details please call 212-725-6516 or email register@vinosite.com.

School’s out! Vino’s Italian wine classes will return in the Spring!


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